adventures abroad, photography, travel, ups and downs

Fly away home

As with the night before when I had the disembarkment looming over me, I find it hard to sleep with the morning flight coming up. I’m up ahead of my alarm and the back-up wake-up call, and out on the shuttle bus to Melbourne airport with plenty of time to spare.

At home, we’re always told to get to the airport at least 3 hours before an international flight.

Continue reading “Fly away home”

adventures abroad, photography, travel

Melbourne

MEL♦bin

My private tour will take me through the Dandenong Ranges and the Yarra Valley today.

The first stop in Dandenong is Puffing Billy, the preserved steam train that is a major tourist attraction. My tour guide, Jeff, puts me on the train in Belgrave just before it pulls out of the station, to meet me at the next stop in Menzies Creek. Continue reading “Melbourne”

adventures abroad, travel, ups and downs

Arrival in Australia

For the first time since my arrival, I sleep terribly.

We no sooner get close enough to port for my phone to have signal, but I get 2 notices from my office’s cellular carrier that I’ve exceeded my international data limit, and my access is being cut off. (I am able to call about it, and they let me know I can have someone in my office get this resolved for me/authorize further access. This is a nice theory, but it’s Saturday back home; nothing is going to get “resolved” on this issue until I’m back in the States and no longer in need of International access. But whatever.)

What all this means for the day is that I have been hoping to hear from my tour company about today’s plans, but that isn’t going to happen via email now.

Stress-inducing as all that may be — in any case, the first thing is just to get off the ship. Continue reading “Arrival in Australia”

adventures abroad, travel

Across the Tasman

There isn’t much in the way of pictures for the next 2 days on board, because it’s largely windy and rainy on top of far-from-land, and thus for the most part, not much to see outside. I join Alan for the Captain’s Luncheon, as promised. It’s a private event for the 40 or so Most Cruised passengers (and a guest as desired, which is why I am there). For every 6 passengers, one of the senior staff joins the table. At ours, that’s Antonio, the senior Engineer, originally from Italy and scheduled to retire there next year. He and Alan talk “ship” and we cross-talk with the other passengers. Continue reading “Across the Tasman”